It’s game day. Picture yourself as a diehard Green Bay Packers fan. You’re heading to Lambeau Field to root on your favorite team against bitter rivals: the Chicago Bears. Thanks to heavy traffic and the stress of finding the right parking lot, it’s now only 20 minutes before kickoff, and you’re aching to get to your seat.

As you race to secure a spot in the entrance line, a man ambushes you with a question: “How would you like to go in this trailer to see an interactive exhibit of Brett Favre’s incredible career?”

Even the biggest Favre fan would struggle to say yes. At any other moment, you might jump at the opportunity, but the game is about to start.

What kind of experience is this, anyway? You’re wearing a Favre jersey already, and you have three signed footballs at home. You pass on the opportunity, even if it aligns with your interests in a convenient location, because you can’t see how this will enrich your Favre-loving life. Now, the exhibit rep feels more like an obstacle than a fellow fan. You politely race past the human pop-up ad and head to your seat, forgetting all about the potential experience within seconds.

In modern society, event planners and marketing agencies regularly make this faux pas. In their exuberance to flaunt their upcoming gatherings, they forget to focus on the target’s frame of mind. And they get blocked before their messaging can work its magic.

To avoid being seen in a negative light, your objective should focus on being in the right place at the right time with the right message, all while your target is open to your message.

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